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Transparent Tunicate

Transparent Tunicate

Scientific Name: Corella inflata


This is one of the most transparent tunicates found on the Pacific Coast from Alaska to Southern California.  Water enters the top of the tunicate at the incurrent siphon where it is filtered by the gill slits of the pharynx.  The food is then taken into the mouth and stomach.  The waste material is then expelled through rectum and anus in the atrium and passes out the excurrent siphon.  It is this waste material in the rectum that is most easily seen within the tunicate.

Corella inflata is often confused with the similar species Corella willmerianaC. inflata has a shorter rectum as well as a larger “inflated” atrial chamber in comparison to C. willmeriana (Cathy Carolsfeld and Henry Choong, personal communication, Nov. 7, 2017).

References

Lamb, Andrew, and Bernard P. Hanby. Marine Life of the Pacific Northwest: a Photographic Encyclopedia of Invertebrates, Seaweeds and Selected Fishes. Madeira Park, BC, Harbour Publ., 2009.

Purple Intertidal Sponge

Purple Intertidal Sponge

Scientific Name: Haliclona permollis

Authors: Aidan Knudsen and Coral Reynolds


Haliclona permollis, more commonly known as The Purple Intertidal Sponge or Purple Encrusting Sponge is a purple (sometimes pink or grey) sponge with a velvety texture. This sponge is covered with small circular ostia (pores) where water enters and larger osculum where water leaves. The Purple Intertidal Sponge can grow up to 1.6 cm (0.7 in) thick. It lives in the intertidal waters between Southern California and Southern Alaska and can usually be found in waters up to 6m (20ft) deep in the intertidal areas, as well as in tidepools and on rocky shores.

This species is similar to the Breadcrumb Sponge (Halichondria panicea) and both species are frequently found on the rocky shores around Vancouver Island. Similar to other sponges th Purple Intertidal Sponge gets it’s nutrients by constantly moving water through it’s body (which enters through the ostia and leaves via the osculum) and filtering out and ingesting things like bacteria and organic matter.

Canary Rockfish

Canary Rockfish

Scientific Name: Sebastes pinniger

More information on this species is coming soon!